News & Press

February 20, 2011 - Cardinal Seán P. O’Malley’s Remarks at the ‘Liturgy of Lament and Repentance’ in Dublin

February 20, 2011

For Immediate Release
Contact: Kelly Lynch
klynch@rasky.com
(617) 413-9074

(Braintree, Mass.)  February 20, 2011…The Archdiocese of Boston today shared remarks made by Cardinal Seán P. O’Malley in Dublin as he participated in a ‘Liturgy of Lament and Repentance’ for the sexual abuse of children by priests and religious.  The liturgy, which was celebrated at St. Mary’s Pro-Cathedral in Dublin this afternoon, is part of the Apostolic Visitation to the Archdiocese of Dublin. At the beginning of the service, which was prepared principally by survivors, Cardinal Seán and Archbishop Diarmuid Martin prostrated themselves in an act of reparation for the sins and crimes committed by members of the Church.  Later in the liturgy, Cardinal Seán and Archbishop Martin washed the feet of a group of people who have in some way been impacted by abuse.

Cardinal Seán’s remarks follow:

“My brothers and sisters, I am very grateful for this opportunity to be with you today and to take part in such a moving service of reparation and hope. I am especially thankful to our Holy Father, Pope Benedict, for his care for the Church in Ireland and for inviting me to be part of this Visitation.  

“On behalf of the Holy Father, I ask forgiveness for the sexual abuse of children perpetrated by priests and the past failures of the Church’s hierarchy, here and in Rome; the failure to respond appropriately to the problem of sexual abuse.  Publicly atoning for the Church’s failures is an important element of asking the forgiveness of those who have been harmed by priests and bishops, whose actions - and inactions - gravely harmed the lives of children entrusted to their care. 

“The O’Malleys hail from County Mayo, a part of Ireland that was hallowed by St. Patrick’s ministry there.  They tell the story of a dramatic conversion of an Irish chieftain by the name of Ossian.  A huge crowd assembled in a field to witness his baptism.  St. Patrick arrived in his Bishop’s vestments with his miter and staff.  St. Patrick stuck his staff in the ground and began to preach a long sermon on the Catholic faith.  The people noted that Ossian, who was standing directly in front of St. Patrick, began to sweat profusely, he grew pale and fainted dead away.  Some people rushed over to help and they discovered to everyone’s horror that St. Patrick had driven his staff through the man’s foot.  When they were able to revive Ossian they said to him, ‘Why did you not say something?’  And the fierce warrior replied, ‘I thought that it was part of the ceremony.’

“The warrior did not understand too much about liturgy and rituals, but he did understand that discipleship is often difficult.  It means carrying the Cross.  It is a costly grace and often we fall down on the job.

“Jesus teaches us about His love in the Parable of the Good Samaritan where in a certain sense the Samaritan represents Christ, who is so moved to compassion by the sight of the man left half dead on the road to Jericho.  The innocent victim of the crime is abandoned by all.  The priests and levites turn their back on him, the police fail to protect him, the innkeeper profits from the tragedy.  It is Christ who identifies with the man who is suffering and showers compassion on him. 

“Jesus is always on the side of the victim, bringing compassion and mercy.  Jesus is not just the healer in the Gospel.  He identifies with the sick, suffering, homeless, all innocent victims of violence and abuse and all survivors of sexual abuse.  The Parable ends with injunction; ‘Go and do likewise!’; just as Jesus turns His love and compassion to those who have been violently attacked or sexually abused.  We want to be part of a Church that puts survivors, the victims of abuse first, ahead of self-interest, reputation and institutional needs. 

“We have no doubt of Jesus’ compassion and love for the survivors even when they feel unloved, rejected, or disgraced.  Our desire is that our Church reflect that love and concern for the survivors of sexual abuse and their families and be tireless in assuring the protection of children in our Church and in society.

“From my own experience in several dioceses with the tragic evil of sexual abuse of minors I see that your wounds are a source of profound distress.  Many survivors have struggled with addictions.  Others have experienced greatly damaged relationships with parents, spouses and children.  The suffering of families has been a terrible and very serious effect of the abuse.  Some of you have even suffered the tragedy of a loved one having taken their own life because of the abuse perpetrated on them.  The deaths of these beloved children of God weigh heavily on our hearts.  

“The wounds carried in Ireland as a result of this evil are deep and remind us of the wounds of the body of Christ.  We think of Jesus in the Garden of Gethsemane as he experienced his own crisis.  He, too, was overwhelmed with sorrow, betrayed and abandoned. Not only survivors of abuse and their family members, but many of the faithful and clergy throughout Ireland can echo our Lord’s plaintive cry, ‘My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?’ But today, through the saving power of the Cross, we come together to share in each other’s sorrows as well as our collective hope for the future.  We come together to bind up the wounds we carry as a result of this crisis and to join in prayer for healing, reconciliation and renewed unity.

“Based on the experience I have had with this Visitation, I believe there is a window of opportunity for the Church here to respond to the crisis in a way that will build a holier Church that strives to be more humble even as it grows stronger.  While we have understandably heard much anger and learned of much suffering, we have also witnessed a sincere desire to strengthen and rebuild the Church here.  We have seen that there is a vast resource, a reservoir of faith and a genuine desire to work for reconciliation and renewal.

“During the course of many meetings, I have been blessed to hear from many survivors and their families, lay women and men and religious and clergy who seek reconciliation and healing.  Today’s service, which survivors so generously assisted in planning and are participating in, gives testimony to the longing of so many to rebuild and renew this Archdiocese and the Church throughout Ireland.

“Just as the Irish people persevered and preserved the faith when it was endangered, and carried it to many other countries, the commitment to sustain the faith provides the opportunity for the hard lessons of the crisis to benefit the Church in our quest to do penance for the sins of the past and to do everything possible to protect children in the present and in the future.

“I would like to conclude my remarks by sharing another parable with you that further illustrates the demands of the Great Commandment which contains the whole Law and the prophets.  The Japanese tell the story of a man who lived in a beautiful home on the top of a mountain.  Each day he took a walk in his garden and looked out at the sea below.  One day he spotted a tsunami on the horizon coming toward the shore and then he noticed a group of his neighbors having a picnic on the beach.  The man was anxious to warn his neighbors, he shouted and waved his arms.  But they were too far off, they could not hear nor see him.  So the man set fire to his house.  When the neighbors on the beach saw the smoke and flames some said let us climb the mountain to help our friend save his home.  Others said:  ‘That mountain is so high and we’re having such fun, you go.’  Well, the ones who climbed the mountain to save their neighbor’s home were themselves saved.  Those who remained on the beach having fun perished when the tidal wave hit the shore. 

“The Gospel of Christ is about love, sacrifice, forgiveness, hope and salvation.  The burning house on the top of the hill is the Cross, and it is the suffering of all those children who experienced abuse.  Climbing the mountain, we are not doing God a favor, we are saving our souls.”